Adding support for Dark Mode to web applications

MacOS Mojave, Apple's newest operating system, now features a Dark Mode interface. In Dark Mode, the entire system adopts a darker color palette. Many third-party desktop applications have already been updated to support Dark Mode.

Today, more and more organizations rely on cloud-based web applications to support their workforce; from Gmail to Google Docs, SalesForce, Drupal, WordPress, GitHub, Trello and Jira. Unlike native desktop applications, web applications aren't able to adopt the Dark Mode interface. I personally spend more time using web applications than desktop applications, so not having web applications support Dark Mode defeats its purpose.

This could change as the next version of Safari adds a new CSS media query called prefers-color-scheme. Websites can use it to detect if Dark Mode is enabled.

I learned about the prefers-color-scheme media query on Jeff Geerling's blog, so I decided to give it a try on my own website. Because I use CSS variables to set the colors of my site, it took less than 30 minutes to add Dark Mode support on dri.es. Here is all the code it took:

@media (prefers-color-scheme: dark) {
  :root {
    --primary-font-color: #aaa;
    --secondary-font-color: #777;
    --background-color: #222;
    --table-zebra-color: #333;
    --table-hover-color: #444;
    --hover-color: #333;
  }
}

If you use MacOS Mojave, Safari 12.1 or later, and have Dark Mode enabled, my site will be shown in black:

An animated image of my site switching between dark mode and regular mode

It will be interesting to see if any of the large web applications, like Gmail or Google Docs will adopt Dark Mode. I bet they will, because it adds a level of polish that will be expected in the future.

My thoughts on IBM buying Red Hat for $34 billion

It was just announced that IBM bought Red Hat for $34 billion in cash. Wow!

I remember taking the bus to the local bookstore to buy the Red Hat Linux 5.2 CD-ROMs. It must have been 1998. Ten years later, Red Hat acted as an inspiration for starting my own Open Source business.

While it's a bit sad to see the largest, independent Open Source company get acquired, it's also great news for Open Source. IBM has been a strong proponent and contributor to Open Source, and its acquisition of Red Hat should help accelerate Open Source even more. IBM has the ability to introduce Open Source to more organizations in a way that Red Hat never could.

Just a few weeks ago, I wrote that 2018 is a breakout year for Open Source businesses. The acquisition of Red Hat truly cements that, as this is one of the largest acquisitions in the history of technology. It's very exciting to see that the largest technology companies in the world are getting comfortable with Open Source as part of their mainstream business.

Thirty-four billion is a lot of money, but IBM had to do something big to get back into the game. Public cloud gets all the attention, but hybrid cloud is just now setting up for growth. It was only last year that both Amazon Web Services and Google partnered with VMware on hybrid cloud offerings, so IBM isn't necessarily late to the hybrid cloud game. Both IBM and Red Hat are big believers in hybrid cloud, so this acquisition makes sense and helps IBM compete with Amazon, Google and Microsoft in terms of hybrid cloud.

In short, this should be great for Open Source, it should be good for IBM, and it should be healthy for the cloud wars.

PS: I predict that Jim Whitehurst becomes IBM's CEO in less than five years.

A book for decoupled Drupal practitioners

The cover of the Decoupled Drupal book

Drupal has evolved significantly over the course of its long history. When I first built the Drupal project eighteen years ago, it was a message board for my friends that I worked on in my spare time. Today, Drupal runs two percent of all websites on the internet with the support of an open-source community that includes hundreds of thousands of people from all over the world.

Today, Drupal is going through another transition as its capabilities and applicability continue to expand beyond traditional websites. Drupal now powers digital signage on university campuses, in-flight entertainment systems on commercial flights, interactive kiosks on cruise liners, and even pushes live updates to the countdown clocks in the New York subway system. It doesn't stop there. More and more, digital experiences are starting to encompass virtual reality, augmented reality, chatbots, voice-driven interfaces and Internet of Things applications. All of this is great for Drupal, as it expands its market opportunity and long-term relevance.

Several years ago, I began to emphasize the importance of an API-first approach for Drupal as part of the then-young phenomenon of decoupled Drupal. Now, Drupal developers can count on JSON API, GraphQL and CouchDB, in addition to a range of surrounding tools for developing the decoupled applications described above. These decoupled Drupal advancements represent a pivotal point in Drupal's history.

Decoupled Drupal sites
A few examples of organizations that use decoupled Drupal.

Speaking of important milestones in Drupal's history, I remember the first Drupal book ever published in 2005. At the time, good information on Drupal was hard to find. The first Drupal book helped make the project more accessible to new developers and provided both credibility and reach in the market. Similarly today, decoupled Drupal is still relatively new, and up-to-date literature on the topic can be hard to find. In fact, many people don't even know that Drupal supports decoupled architectures. This is why I'm so excited about the upcoming publication of a new book entitled Decoupled Drupal in Practice, written by Preston So. It will give decoupled Drupal more reach and credibility.

When Preston asked me to write the foreword for the book, I jumped at the chance because I believe his book will be an important next step in the advancement of decoupled Drupal. I've also been working with Preston So for a long time. Preston is currently Director of Research and Innovation at Acquia and a globally respected expert on decoupled Drupal. Preston has been involved in the Drupal community since 2007, and I first worked with him directly in 2012 on the Spark initiative to improve Drupal's editorial user experience. Preston has been researching, writing and speaking on the topic of decoupled Drupal since 2015, and had a big impact on my thinking on decoupled Drupal, on Drupal's adoption of React, and on decoupled Drupal architectures in the Drupal community overall.

To show the value that this book offers, you can read exclusive excerpts of three chapters from Decoupled Drupal in Practice on the Acquia blog and at the Acquia Developer Center. It is available for preorder today on Amazon, and I encourage my readers to pick up a copy!

Congratulations on your book, Preston!

Acquia's new European headquarters

While Acquia's global headquarters are in Boston, we have fourteen offices all over the world. Last week, we moved our European headquarters to a larger space in Reading, UK. We've been steadily growing in Europe, and the new Reading office now offers room for 120 employees. It's an exciting move. Here are a few photos:

Reading office
Reading office
Reading office
Reading office
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