We spent the weekend exploring Tuscany by car. Each day we drove through vineyards, hilltop towns and medieval cities on narrow, winding roads that often turned into unpaved backroads. Wanting to get the most out of the trip, we stopped from time to time to take in the amazing views and eat pecorino cheese.

Rolling hills with vineyards

Terracotta roof tiles

How the iMac was Apple's financial lifeline
© Asymco

I love this graph. It shows that for some time, Apple's primary source of revenue was the sale of the Macintosh computer. The Macintosh provided Apple with a bridge between the desktop era and the mobile era, represented by the two clusters on the graph. That bridge was a financial lifeline. Without it, Apple might not have survived.

The Sport Loop is the most comfortable band for the Apple Watch

I've been using my new Apple Watch 3 for several months, and recently I've been in the market for a new band. Previously, I was using a standard synthetic rubber band. I'd come home from work, and the first thing I wanted to do was take my Apple Watch off. I didn't like the clammy feel of the band, and the fit was either too loose or too tight. This week, I decided to try the new Sport Loop.

I'm currently in Chicago visiting our Acquia office, and it's pretty warm out. The Sport Loop has proven to been a great alternative. It is made out of woven nylon, it's breathable and it has a little bit of stretch. It's not going to win fashion awards, but it is comfortable enough to wear all day and I no longer feel the urge to take off my watch in the evening.

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How the Open Demographics Initiative recommends you ask for gender information
© Open Demographics Initiative's gender identification questions

Last week, Nikki Stevens presented "Other, Please Specify" for TEDx at Arizona State University. In her TED Talk, Nikki shares the story behind the Open Demographics Initiative, which is developing a recommended set of questions that anyone can use to ask online community members about their demographics.

Nikki demonstrates how a majority of demographic surveys require users to conform to restrictive identity fields, which can alienate minority or underrepresented groups. The Open Demographics Initiative wants to develop forms that are more inclusive, in addition to giving people more control over the data and information they chose to disclose.

Inspired by Nikki's presentation, I reached out to the engineering team at the Drupal Association to see if there are plans to implement the Open Demographics Initiative's recommendations on Drupal.org. I was happy to learn that they are collaborating with the Open Demographics team to add the recommendations to the user registration process on Drupal.org.

Adopting Open Demographics on Drupal.org will also allow us to improve reporting on diversity and inclusion, which in turn will help us better support initiatives that advance diversity and inclusion. Plus, we can lead by example and inspire other organizations to do the same.

Thank you Nikki, for sharing the story behind the Open Demographics Initiative, and for helping to inspire change in the Drupal community and beyond.

Last night, I read a thoughtful blog post from Sebastian Greger, which examines the challenges of implementing privacy in a decentralized, social web. As a part of my own POSSE plan, I had proposed implementing support for Webmention on dri.es. This would allow me to track comments, likes, reposts, and other rich interactions across the web on my own site.

Sebastian correctly explains that when you pull in content from social media websites into your own site with the intention of owning the conversation, you are effectively taking ownership of other people's content. This could be in conflict with the GDPR regulation, for example, which sets tight rules on how personal data is processed, and requires us to think more about how personal data is syndicated on the web.

Data protection is important, but so is a decentralized, social web. These conversations, and the innovation that hopefully results from it, are important. If we fail to make the Open Web compliant with data regulations, we could empower walled gardens and stifle innovation towards a more decentralized web.