Making the web easier and safer with the Web Authentication standard

Firefox 60 was released a few weeks ago and now comes with support for the upcoming Web Authentication (WebAuthn) standard.

Other major web browsers weren't far behind. Yesterday, the release of Google Chrome 67 also included support for the Web Authentication standard.

I'm excited about it because it can make the web both easier and safer to use.

The Web Authentication standard will make the web easier, because it is a big step towards eliminating passwords on the web. Instead of having to manage passwords, we'll be able to use web-based fingerprints, facial authentication, voice recognition, a smartphone, or hardware security keys like the YubiKey.

It will also make the web safer, because it will help reduce or even prevent phishing, man-in-the-middle attacks, and credential theft. If you are interested in learning more about the security benefits of the Web Authentication standard, I recommend reading Adam Langley's excellent analysis.

When I have a bit more time for side projects, I'd like to buy a YubiKey 4C to see how it fits in my daily workflow, in addition to what it would look like to add Web Authentication support to Drupal and https://dri.es.

Drupal.org gets videos that make Drupal easier to learn

In the beginning of the year I started doing some iOS development for my POSSE plan. As I was new to iOS development, I decided to teach myself by watching short, instructional videos. Different people learn in different ways, but for me, videos tutorials were the most effective way to learn.

Given that recent experience, I'm very excited to share that all of the task tutorials in the Drupal 8 User Guide are now accompanied by video tutorials. These videos are embedded directly into every user guide page on Drupal.org. You can see an example on the "Editing with the in-place editor" page.

These videos provide a great introduction to installing, administering, site building and maintaining the content of a Drupal-based website — all important skills for a new Drupalist to learn. Supplementing user guides with video tutorials is an important step towards improving our evaluator experience, as video can often convey a lot more than text.

Creating high-quality videos is hard and time-consuming work. Over the course of six months, the team at Drupalize.Me has generously contributed a total of 52 videos! I want to give a special shout-out to Joe Shindelar and the Drupalize.Me team for creating these videos and to Jennifer Hodgdon and Neil Drumm (Drupal Association) for helping to get each video posted on Drupal.org.

What a fantastic gift to the community!

It was such a beautiful day at the Belgian coast that we decided to go on a bike ride. We ended up doing a 44 km (27 miles) ride that took us from the North Sea beach, through the dunes into the beautiful countryside around Bruges.

Riante polder route

The photo shows the seemingly endless rows of poplar trees along a canal in Damme. The canal (left of the trees, not really visible in the photo) was constructed by Napoleon Bonaparte to enable the French army to move around much faster and to transport supplies more rapidly. At the time, canal boats were drawn by horses on roads alongside the canal. Today, many of these narrow roads have been turned into bike trails.

When should we release Drupal 9?

Since the release of Drupal 8.0.0 in November 2015, the Drupal 8 core committers have been discussing when and how we'll release Drupal 9. Nat Catchpole, one of Drupal 8's core committers, shared some excellent thoughts about what goes into making that decision.

The driving factor in that discussion is security support for Drupal 8’s third party dependencies (e.g. Symfony, Twig, Guzzle, jQuery, etc). Our top priority is to ensure that all Drupal users are using supported versions of these components so that all Drupal sites remain secure.

In his blog, Nat uses Symfony as an example. The Symfony project announced that it will stop supporting Symfony 3 in November 2021, which means that Symfony 3 won't receive security updates after that date. Consequently, by November 2021, we need to prepare all Drupal sites to use Symfony 4 or later.

Nothing has been decided yet, but the current thinking is that we have to move Drupal to Symfony 4 or later, release that as Drupal 9, and allow enough time for everyone to upgrade to Drupal 9 by November 2021. Keep in mind that this is just looking at Symfony, and none of the other components.

This proposal builds on top of work we've already done to make Drupal upgrades easy, so upgrades from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9 should be smooth and much simpler than previous upgrades.

If you're interested in the topic, check out Nat's post. He goes in more detail about potential release timelines, including how this impacts our thinking about Drupal 7, Drupal 8 and even Drupal 10. It's a complicated topic, but the goal of Nat's post is to raise awareness and to solicit input from the broader community before we decide our official timeline and release dates on Drupal.org.

The Royal Family using Drupal

Last weekend, over 29 million people watched the Royal Wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. While there is a tremendous amount of excitement surrounding the newlyweds, I was personally excited to learn that the royal family's website is built with Drupal! Royal.uk is the official website of the British royal family, and is visited by an average of 12 million people each year. Check it out at https://www.royal.uk!

Royal uk