How Wendy's sells fresh, never-frozen hamburgers online

Dries interviews Mike Mancuso from Wendy's

During the Innovation Showcase at Acquia Engage, I invited Mike Mancuso, head of digital analytics at Wendy's, on stage. Wendys.com is a Drupal site running on Acquia Cloud, and welcomes 30 million unique visitors a year. Wendy's also uses Acquia Lift to deliver personalized and intelligent experiences to all 30 million visitors.

In the 8-minute video below, Mike explains how Wendy's engages with its customers online.

For the occasion, the team at Wendy's decided to target Acquia Engage attendees. If you visited Wendys.com from Acquia Engage, you got the following personalized banner. It's a nice example of what you can do with Acquia Lift.

Wendy's used Acquia Lift to target Acquia Engage attendees on their website

As part of my keynote, we also demoed the next generation of Acquia Lift, which will be released in early 2019. In 2018, we decided that user experience always has to come first. We doubled our design and user experience team and changed our product development process to reflect this priority. The upcoming version of Acquia Lift is the first example of that. It offers more than just a fresh UI; it also ships with new features to simplify how marketers create campaigns. If you want a preview, have look at the 9-minute video below!

Forty

Fortieth birthday coffee mug

Today I turned forty. This morning, Axl and Stan surprised me with coffee in bed, served in a special birthday mug that they created.

When getting ready for a birthday party this weekend, I shaved not only my beard, but also my nose and ear hair. It sums up turning forty nicely.

Much of the things they say about turning forty are true: getting adequate sleep has become a priority, you no longer recognize celebrities in magazines, forgetfulness starts to become a bigger issue, and when you bend down to pick something up, there is no guarantee that you'll make it back up.

I can't complain though. On days like today, when looking back at the previous decade, I'm reminded how lucky and privileged I am.

Much like I hoped I would when I turned thirty, I have accomplished a lot in my thirties — both personally and professionally.

Drupal, Acquia and Open Source have been at the center of my professional career for the last decade and it has changed my life in every way. I'm lucky that my work gives me so much purpose. My desire to create, build, sustain and give back is as strong as before — there is not much more I'd want professionally.

Throughout the past ten years, I've also accomplished a lot of personal growth. I smile thinking how I have become more generous with my "I love you"s. I've gained not just weight, but also a kind of resiliency and perspective that enabled me to better deal with criticism, conflict or setbacks at work. I've learned not to sweat the small stuff and I take pride in acting with integrity on a consistent basis. From that point of view, I look forward to growing up more.

I've seen more of the world in the last ten years than in the first thirty combined. My wanderlust continues to grow and I look forward to exploring more of the world.

I've also been writing on this blog throughout the past decade. That might sound odd to call out on a day like today, but it's an accomplishment to me. My blog could have faded away like most blogs do, but it hasn't. It is one of my longest running projects and a highlight of my thirties. Blogging has made me a better communicator and a more critical thinker. It touches me that some people have been reading my blog for over a decade, and have followed me throughout my thirties. Thanks for sticking with me!

Entering my forties, part of me has zero desire to slow down, while another part of me wants to find more time to spend with Vanessa, Axl, Stan, family and friends. By the time I'll be fifty, Axl and Stan will likely be in college and might have moved out. There is nothing more satisfying than spending time with loved ones, yet it is so hard to pull off.

Acquia Engage 2018 keynote

A photo of an Acquia billboard at the Austin airport
When Acquia Engage attendees arrived at the Austin-Bergstrom International Airport for Acquia Engage 2018, they were greeted by an Acquia display.

Last week, Acquia welcomed more than 600 attendees to the fifth annual Acquia Engage Conference in Austin, Texas. During my keynote, my team and I talked about Acquia's strategy, recent product developments, and our product roadmap. I also had the opportunity to invite three of our customers on stage — Paychex, NBC Sports, and Wendy's — to hear how each organization is leveraging the Acquia Platform.

All three organizations demonstrate incredible use cases, and I invite you to watch the recording of the Innovation Showcase (78 minutes) or download a copy of my slides (219 MB).

I also plan to share more in-depth blog posts on my conversations with Wendy’s, NBC Sports, and Paychex’s next week.

Acquia a leader in the 2018 Forrester Wave for Web Content Management Systems

This week Acquia was named a leader in the Forrester Wave: Web Content Management Systems. Acquia was previously named a leader in WCM systems in Q1 2017.

The report highlights Acquia and Drupal's leadership on decoupled and headless architectures, in addition to Acquia Cloud's support for Node.js.

I'm especially proud of the fact that Acquia received the highest strategy score among all vendors.

Thank you to everyone who contributed to this result! It's another great milestone for Acquia and Drupal.

Thirteen recommendations for how to evolve Drupal's governance

If you want to go quickly, go alone. If you want to go far, go together.

Drupal exists because of its community. What started from humble beginnings has grown into one of the largest Open Source communities in the world. This is due to the collective effort of thousands of community members.

What distinguishes Drupal from other open source projects is both the size and diversity of our community, and the many ways in which thousands of contributors and organizations give back. It's a community I'm very proud to be a part of.

Without the Drupal community, the Drupal project wouldn't be where it is today and perhaps would even cease to exist. That is why we are always investing in our community and why we constantly evolve how we work with one another.

The last time we made significant changes to Drupal's governance was over five years ago when we launched a variety of working groups. Five years is a long time. The time had come to take a step back and to look at Drupal's governance with fresh eyes.

Throughout 2017, we did a lot of listening. We organized both in-person and virtual roundtables to gather feedback on how we can improve our community governance. This led me to invest a lot of time and effort in documenting Drupal's Values and Principles.

In 2018, we transitioned from listening to planning. Earlier this year, I chartered the Drupal Governance Task Force. The goal of the task force was to draft a set of recommendations for how to evolve and strengthen Drupal's governance based on all of the feedback we received. Last week, after months of work and community collaboration, the task force shared thirteen recommendations (PDF).

The proposal from the Drupal Governance Task Force
Me reviewing the Drupal Governance proposal on a recent trip.

Before any of us jump to action, the Drupal Governance Task Force recommended a thirty-day, open commentary period to give community members time to read the proposal and to provide more feedback. After the thirty-day commentary period, I will work with the community, various stakeholders, and the Drupal Association to see how we can move these recommendations forward. During the thirty-day open commentary period, you can then get involved by collaborating and responding to each of the individual recommendations below:

I'm impressed by the thought and care that went into writing the recommendations, and I'm excited to help move them forward.

Some of the recommendations are not new and are ideas that either the Drupal Association, myself or others have been working on, but that none of us have been able to move forward without a significant amount of funding or collaboration.

I hope that 2019 will be a year of organizing and finding resources that allow us to take action and implement a number of the recommendations. I'm convinced we can make valuable progress.

I want to thank everyone who has participated in this process. This includes community members who shared information and insight, facilitated conversations around governance, were interviewed by the task force, and supported the task force's efforts. Special thanks to all the members of the task force who worked on this with great care and determination for six straight months: Adam Bergstein, Lyndsey Jackson, Ela Meier, Stella Power, Rachel Lawson, David Hernandez and Hussain Abbas.

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