Accelerate Drupal 8 by funding a Core Committer

Fingers on keyboard

We have ambitious goals for Drupal 8, including new core features such as Workspaces (content staging) and Layout Builder (drag-and-drop blocks), completing efforts such as the Migration path and Media in core, automated upgrades, and adoption of a JavaScript framework.

I met with several of the coordinators behind these initiatives. Across the board, they identified the need for faster feedback from Core Committers, citing that a lack of Committer time was often a barrier to the initiative's progress.

We have worked hard to scale the Core Committer Team. When Drupal 8 began, it was just catch and myself. Over time, we added additional Core Committers, and the team is now up to 13 members. We also added the concept of Maintainer roles to create more specialization and focus, which has increased our velocity as well.

I recently challenged the Core Committer Team and asked them what it would take to double their efficiency (and improve the velocity of all other core contributors and core initiatives). The answer was often straightforward; more time in the day to focus on reviewing and committing patches.

Most don't have funding for their work as Core Committers. It's something they take on part-time or as volunteers, and it often involves having to make trade-offs regarding paying work or family.

Of the 13 members of the Core Committer Team, three people noted that funding could make a big difference in their ability to contribute to Drupal 8, and could therefore help them empower others:

  • Lauri 'lauriii' Eskola, Front-end Framework Manager — Lauri is deeply involved with both the Out-of-the-Box Experience and the JavaScript Framework initiatives. In his role as front-end framework manager, he also reviews and unblocks patches that touch CSS/JS/HTML, which is key to many of the user-facing features in Drupal 8.5's roadmap.
  • Francesco 'plach' Placella, Framework Manager — Francesco has extensive experience in the Entity API and multilingual initiatives, making him an ideal reviewer for initiatives that touch lots of moving parts such as API-First and Workflow. Francesco was also a regular go-to for the Drupal 8 Accelerate program due to his ability to dig in on almost any problem.
  • Roy 'yoroy' Scholten, Product Manager — Roy has been involved in UX and Design for Drupal since the Drupal 5 days. Roy's insights into usability best practices and support and mentoring for developers is invaluable on the core team. He would love to spend more time doing those things, ideally supported by a multitude of companies each contributing a little, rather than just one.

Funding a Core Committer is one of the most high-impact ways you can contribute to Drupal. If you're interested in funding one or more of these amazing contributors, please contact me and I'll get you in touch with them.

Note that there is also ongoing discussion in Drupal.org's issue queue about how to expose funding opportunities for all contributors on Drupal.org.

Comments

Frank Kelly (not verified):

As the maintainer of a simple site (part blog, part picture gallery, part "brochure"), that runs on shared web hosting and that has been deprecated by your (Dries) recent statement of direction, it's hard to justify committing funds to supporting software that may well pull the rug out from under my efforts, by for instance requiring Composer. Drupal 8 has a number of great features (views for one, flexible creation of content types for another) that I would love to know I could continue using indefinitely. Given the statement of direction that's not assured.

Tell me that I will always be able to install an updated distribution from the tar.gz's and that someone will actually resolve longstanding issues such as: in issue 2061337 (Allow image style to be selected in Text Editor's image dialog (necessary for structured content)) and move past that to allow us to insert reasonably complex text in a ckeditor screen (both uploading new images and reusing existing ones)) and I'd throw some money into the pot.

simplyshipley (not verified):

I think everyone that makes money with Drupal should give an hour or two of their wages to help push the project forward.

greg boggs (not verified):

Hi Frank,

While I understand your concerns about learning Composer, it's really pretty great and saves you a lot of trouble. You should give it a try.

There is also a native Drupal solution that you might be more comfortable using:

https://www.drupal.org/project/ludwig

Both Ludwig and Composer will work great on websites hosted on $5/mo shared hosting because composer runs locally on your own computer. While Drupal is a product that will build the largest websites in the world, it still works great for small websites like yours.

Ajay Gallewale (not verified):

Although I can see the merit of funding core committer, I am wondering if it should be the priority from timeline perspective.

Drupal 8 is out for a while still vast number of sites have not moved from drupal 7. A large part of this is because some of the big contributed modules are not on Drupal 7. This is also hurting drupal ecosystem by less developers engaging and contributing to community, less dollars and opportunities available from customers till they see key modules available on D8.

I think, at this time, getting funding to get some of the highly installed contributed modules upgraded to Drupal 8 will provide more collective benefit to Drupal. It would also have side effect of more customers on Drupal 8, opening future growth.

rooby (not verified):

I agree with this.

While some of the new core features sound fantastic, outside of the core media functionality being unfinished, contrib is the biggest hurdle to my adoption of Drupal 8 for client sites.

Most clients I have encountered are not willing to fork out the money required (or don't have the money required) to fix Drupal 8 modules or write custom code when the same functionality is available out of the box with Drupal 7.

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